What’s at stake?

The Census count affects funding for many programs that impact residents of Southeast Michigan.

Below, you can see how much was spent in Michigan on some familiar programs in 2016. Click the programs below to learn more about the programs.

$12 billion

Medicaid

$110 million

School Breakfast Program

$116 million

Health Care Centers

$780 million

Federal Pell Grants

$80 million

Community Block Grants

What is the Census?

Learn more about the Census from its history to budget issues to how it impacts local funding with our 12-blog series you can scroll through below, exploring these and other Census-related topics.

Census 2020 – What is the Census?

What is the Census? Every 10 years in the United States the decennial census takes place. The census is a constitutionally-mandated count of all of the people currently living in the country. Almost every government program you can think of is budgeted based on the...

Introduction to the US Census Budget

This is the second blog post in an in-depth series exploring the history and future of the U.S. Census. Explore our first post introducing readers to the history of the census and its importance. Introduction to the US Census Budget Few people doubt the importance of...

2020 Census Budget Challenges

This is the third blog post in an in-depth series exploring the history and future of the U.S. Census. Explore our first post introducing readers to the history of the census and its importance or the second post introducing the census budget.History of Data Driven...

Census 2020 Cost-Saving Innovations

This is the fourth blog post in an in-depth series exploring the history and future of the US Census. Explore our first post introducing readers to the history of the census and its importance or the first post introducing the census budget. If you’re interested in...

How Does the Census Use Local Administrative Data?

This is the fifth blog post in an in-depth series exploring the history and future of the US Census. Explore our first post introducing readers to the history of the census and its importance or the first post introducing the census budget. If you’re interested in...

Data Security and the Census

This is the sixth blog post in an in-depth series exploring the history and future of the US Census. Explore our first post introducing readers to the history of the census and its importance. If you’re interested in other subjects related to Census 2020, check out...

Redistricting and the Census

This is the seventh blog post in an in-depth series exploring the history and future of the US Census. Explore our first post introducing readers to the history of the census and its importance. If you’re interested in other subjects related to Census 2020, check out...

Measuring Hard to Count Populations

This is the eighth blog post in an in-depth series exploring the history and future of the US Census. Explore our first post introducing readers to the history of the census and its importance. If you’re interested in other subjects related to the census, check out...

Census 2010’s Hard to Count Outreach Efforts

This is the ninth blog post in an in-depth series exploring the history and future of the US Census. Explore our first post introducing readers to the history of the census and its importance. If you’re interested in other subjects related to the census, check out the...

Planned Hard to Count Outreach Programs for 2020

This is the tenth blog post in an in-depth series exploring the history and future of the US Census. Explore our first post introducing readers to the history of the census and its importance. If you’re interested in other subjects related to the census, check out the...

Who gets counted?

The goal of the Census is to count all people residing in the
United States at their usual residence—where they live and
sleep most of the time.

Not sure where you’ll be counted?

See if one of these specific situations applies to you:

Homeowners and Renters

with one residence will be counted at this residence, even if not physically there on April 1, 2020.

Temporary Residents

such as vacationers or multi-home owners
will receive the Census form at each housing unit, but should respond only from their usual address of residence.

Children Under Shared Custody

will be counted at the residence where they live and sleep most of the time.

Non-Citizen Residents

are counted at their usual U.S. address. Tourists and travelers are not counted.

Group Facility Residents

will be counted at the facility in which they are housed or living on April 1, 2020.

Active Military & Family

will be counted at their usual residence if stationed in the U.S. Those stations overseas are counted as part of the federally-affiliated overseas population.

College Students

are counted at their on-campus housing or usual residence, even if on holiday or break. Those attending school outside the U.S. are not counted.

Persons Living Abroad

as part of a federal mission are counted as part of the federally-affiliated overseas population. Other expats are not counted.

Persons Experiencing Homelessness

will be counted at their usual residence if applicable, or at the temporary shelter, residence, or outdoor location where they are present on April 1, 2020.

Who might be missed?

Hard to count populations make up large portions of Southeast Michigan’s residents, which is why there is such a strong effort to make sure everyone is counted.

These are some of the usual missing pieces to a community’s Census count:

For more information on these populations and how we can make sure they are counted, check out our Census Blog Posts.

Get Involved!

These graphics and flyers can help you talk about the Census to your friends and family! We all need to pitch in to make sure Southeast Michigan has a complete count.

Get Connected!

Share your stories about how these programs have affected you, or learn more about the 2020 Census at the next DiscoTech, hosted by the Detroit Digital Justice Coalition and the Detroit Community Technology Project. The next DiscoTech will be on Saturday, February 29 2020 from noon-3pm, at Detroit Association of Black Organizations (inside the Sheffield Center – 12048 Grand River, Detroit, MI 48204).